Irish Potato Bread a.k.a. Fadge

Having travelled to Northern Ireland more than twenty-five times, I’ve had my share of Irish potato bread or “fadge”. I first remember eating potato bread in the kitchen of a distant cousin in Lurgan, County Armagh. My grandparents, mother, sister and I crammed into her small booth- style table and proceeded to chow down on a traditional Ulster Fry, which of course, includes this delicious little thing. Fadge is also known as a potato “farl” from the Gaelic word “fardel” meaning “four parts”.
Fadge Potato Bread
Check out the small pools of melted butter on top. Get yourself some Kerrygold if you want the real deal.
flour and butter Although the recipe originally called for about 1/2 cup of flour, I found I needed substantially more to achieve a dough I could work with.
mashed potatoes
Use floury (i.e. baking) potatoes for best results.
irish potato cake dough Have plenty of flour nearby.
IMGP3134.PEF The dough, pressed into a thin layer and cut into quarters. Ready for the pan.
IMGP3138.PEFI sprinkled a bit of flour on each side of the potato bread before placing it into the pan. This helped created a slightly crunchy exterior.
IMGP3140.PEF Farls looking good – nice crust!
IMGP3146.PEF
Because I was anxious to eat this, I didn’t even bother to make an egg…which is what I normally eat it with in Ireland.
Potato bread can be purchased all over northern Ireland in corner shops and bakeries. I normally buy those made by Genesis – who happen to also make excellent scones. But there’s nothing quite like knowing how to make your own, too. The next time you have a couple of baking potatoes around, cook them up and make yourself some fadge. You’ll be hooked, I promise.

10 comments :

Country Girl said...

I love the interesting depth of field you're using here. Gosh, these are beauties!

Dracozombie said...

Had these as a part of breakfast when I visited Northern Ireland, and have been hungry for them ever since. I'm going to try this recipe out tonight!

Elizabeth said...

Country Girl...thanks! Been experimenting with the lens a bit.

Dracozombie...hope you liked 'em! They are one of my favorites!

Anonymous said...

this is the best recipe I have come across thank you from an ulster man

Irish kiwi. said...

I was raised by my Grandmother who was from Belfast, potatoe bread and Potatoe apple cake were our standard Friday night dinner, a great child hood memory. I am now teaching my grandchildren to make it but I always remember my grandmother cooked the potatoes in their jackets and once cooked must be peeled while hot and never mashed but used an implement like a giant garlic crusher (potato ricer has to do the job now) flour added quickly so it starts cooking straight away.  We always made enough to have with a fry up the next morning.......

Irish kiwi said...

sorry try Potato not Potatoe.

aelish said...

You're so lucky to have had such wonderful cooking...and memories. I think using a ricer is a great idea and probably produces a more tender bread. By the way, finally had my first Potato Apple Cake on the last trip I made and I loved it...now looking for a way to make it myself. :)

Lindsay bradley said...

My Gran and Mum from Ballymena always cooked it on a hot griddle with no fat just flour.. It was wonderful hot off the griddle or cold. Usually the next morning it would be fried in bacon fat with dollops of butter slathered on it....Oh I just put on a pound thinking about it...ha ha...

Winsaad said...

These are exactly what my grandmother used to make - she cooked them on a cast iron skillet - no butter - but cooked dry - then, when hot, smother with butter and eat.  Wonderful

Larrymckenna said...

mee gobe is soakin !